Johanne’s voice matters

Image: Presentation for BUP St. Olavs Hospital. From the left: Johanne Bakken Moe, Ingvild M. Kvisle og Juni Raak Høiseth.

Presentation for BUP St. Olavs Hospital. From the left: Johanne Bakken Moe, Ingvild M. Kvisle og Juni Raak Høiseth.

Johanne Bakken Moe, Juni Raak Høiseth and Ingvild M. Kvisle were present at a gathering at Psychiatric clinic for children and youth St. Olavs Hospital (BUP) 7. June to talk about the project «Min stemme teller», or «My voice matters».

Johanne was one of the informants form BUP being interviewed in the first round of this project. Now she has taken a step further, and works as project team member on My voice matters. We had a talk with her regarding her participation in the project, and what it was like to hold the presentation.


Making a difference

What’s it been like to be a part of My voice matters?

– It’s been great! It’s something I’ve really wanted to do, and given me joy. It’s been very stressful, but it’s given me a feeling of meaning something in this world. What we do really makes a difference. We go straight to where the problem is. People at BUP really listen to KBT and the report, whereas if you as a lone individual bring up these matters, it’s easier to ignore.

How did you get involved with this?

– I was at the dialogue conference to My voice matters, and have been itching to do something. I contacted KBT myself to do something after the conference.

 

Not just growing pains
The presentation consisted of Juni describing the method of User Interviews User and how My voice matters is organized, before Ingvild presented a selection of findings from the rapport. Johanne talked about her own experience and what makes a good mental health service. She said it is important that we take the youth’s problems seriously. We can’t always write off their issues as hormones and it just being part of being young. She went on about the things her own psychologist had done right, whom would give her time to talk herself comfortable before talking about what was difficult, and not give up just if they had a rough start together. She spoke in a lively authentic manner, and there was both laughter and tears among the audience.

How did it feel to do the presentation today?

– I was really nervous! It was hard to look up into that hall, and see a bunch of psychologists analyzing things. But once I got started I was fine, even if I don’t quite remember what I said.

 

New project group, new paths
Johanne is a part of the new team that has taken the torch in My voice matters, and received training in the method of User Interviews User. They are to carry out focus group interviews with other people with experiences in receiving help for mental health issues.

Image: From the left: Dagfinn Bjørgen, Lill-Katrin Island, Ida-Michelle Pedersen, Johanne Bakken Moe, Juni Raak Høiseth, Pernille Letrud and Christina Kildal.
New, excited project group. From the left: Dagfinn Bjørgen, Lill-Katrin Island, Ida-Michelle Pedersen, Johanne Bakken Moe, Juni Raak Høiseth, Pernille Letrud and Christina Kildal.

 

You will be working in the new “Min stemme teller”-project. Which thoughts do you have surrounding this?

– I’m really looking forward to it! We’re going to Møre og Romsdal and Nord-Trøndelag. I can’t wait to travel and explore new, different themes from those of the last project. We are five people between 18-21 years. We’ve had training, and we seem like a good team. I hope things spread out, that it will be fun and that more people will want to use KBT for peer involvement.

 

 

 

 

 

Translation: Lasse Strømmen Barr
Photo: Lasse Strømmen Barr og Ingvild M. Kvisle

About Ingvild M. Kvisle

Works as a project team member in KBT. Works with User Interviews User, dialogue meetings, webpage and social media.